Duracoat vs. Gunkote vs Norrell's moly

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Duracoat vs. Gunkote vs Norrell's moly

Postby VanJoe » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:13 pm

I guess the weapons maintenance forum is as good a place as any for this question.

I have a levang compensator on my Oly K3B. Why, I don't know. I should probably just put something else on it and call it good but it's pretty unique, and I'd like to use it enough to decide weather I like it or not. For some reason it is turning silver pretty fast and doesn't match the rest of my rifle. I would like to apply something on it, that is heat resistant, to turn it black again. I did some web research, and figured Duracoat was the best, then I read about the Gunkote product from Brownells, and it's lubricating qualities etc. I even watched a training video on Brownell's website where they were using it to treat and entire, bare metal 1911. They were also talking about it's lubrication qualities. Then I read about the Norrell's moly-resin product that Dtech uses and I figured if he uses it, it must be good stuff.

Can anyone tell me the pros and cons and which one of these products is the best and why? Furthermore, if the Gunkote is such a great lubricator as they say, and so durable, why not coat for example an entire bolt assembly with it? Or the inside of the upper receiver?

I know it's just a compensator I want to turn black. But I would like to know what the best product is, if I ever want to use it for other parts of other rifles.

Thanks in advance.
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Postby Dtech » Fri Jun 29, 2007 4:00 am

I have never used the Duracoat product line, but I have used the Brownell's and now the Norrell's. I had been using the Brownell's product for a few years for coating handguards after cutting the vent slots into them. I was always very meticulous in it's application, and was quite happy with the results. I don't think the Brownell' product was nearly as durable as the Norrell's that I'm now using, but it wasn't bad.

When I started building my integral compensator, I spoke with the technical staff at Brownell's and was told that their product would probably not hold up. I exchanged several emails with John Norrell and he seemed very confident that his product wouldn't have any problems with the temperature, or blast from my integral compensator.

I have a gunsmith friend from Iowa that has used the Duracoat, and was not at all happy with it's durability. He told me that he could often mark the surface with his thumb-nail. I have never tried Duracoat, so I can't vouch for his statement, but I do know the Norrell's moly-resin is VERY hard and durable.

The "flatness" of the finish is dictated by the temperature that you preheat the metal to. The higher the temperature that you preheat it, the flatter the finish. When I first got my oven done, and my Norrell's in-stock, I decided to coat my own .243 WSSM barrel. It was fluted and had my integral compensator. I didn't think about it while I was applying the Norrell's, but the hollow compensator didn't have the thermal mass that the main part of the barrel had. When I began spraying the barrel assembly, the compensator cooled quickly and received a glossier finish than the rest of the barrel. I made the mistake of baking and curing the barrel. The shiny compensator was very conspicuous! I decided to start over, so I took the compensator to the belt-sander and started to remove the Norrell's coating. WOW! That stuff is really on there! Black dust was flying, and I never did get down to the base-metal. I'm sure I could have, but I had the surface roughed up like I wanted, so I just stopped there.

When I went to re-coat my barrel, I would take it out of the oven, give the compensator the first quick sprays, then move on to the rest of the barrel. The theory being that the hollow compensator would not only cool quickly, it would also re-heat quickly. The theory worked out perfectly! I achieved a nice, homogeneous, flat-black surface on the entire barrel.

Once Norrell's is cured, it is impervious to bore-cleaners, salt water, acids and temperature to 1800 degrees F. It will scratch and wear, but then so does bluing or parkerizing. I have modified how I prepare my compensators and flutes for coating. I round all of the edges. Sharp edges are the first to get worn.
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Postby Evil_Lurker » Fri Jun 29, 2007 5:10 am

Thanks for the info, Mike, I'll be using Norrell's after that writeup. Your tips on prep and application are very valuable.
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Postby buttebob » Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:16 am

I'll #1 that, Mike. Thanks.
The very atmosphere of firearms EVERYWHERE restrains evil interference -- they deserve a place of HONOR with all that's good!"

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in a speech to Congress.
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Postby jerry » Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:20 am

Good info thanks guys,

I have a question I would like to add.

Are both the Norrells and Gunkote Moly-resin?

The discriptions seem very similar

Dtech- was the Brownells product you were using their brand of GunKote or one of their other product?
And how bad does the Norrells stink when in the oven for us home based finishers?

Thanks

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Postby Dtech » Fri Jun 29, 2007 4:13 pm

The Brownells product I was using had their own label. When I spoke with Brownells tech line, the guy told me he didn't think anything they sold would do the job for me. He was the one that suggested that I try Norrells. I had remembered that our own StickMan had been using it so I checked with him. He has been using it for quite some time I believe. You should check out some of the stuff that he has coated! Wow, really nice work!

The two products that I used both stunk-up the shop. A friend of mine that uses Norrells told me that if you let the coated part sit overnight before baking it, that it doesn't smell bad at all. I have never tried that.
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Postby Globemaster » Fri Jun 29, 2007 5:14 pm

Dtech wrote:I had remembered that our own Stickman had been using it.


click here ---> Refinishing AR15’s with Norrells Moly Resin ... by: "Stickman"
The Nonsense Stops! … When The Hammer Drops!
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